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“No Go” in the Snow? How to Control Winter Weather Accidents

From Arizona to Maine, this has been an exceptionally snowy winter. All that snow has people feeling cold, but it also has many dog owners feeling a bit steamed… if you catch the drift.

Let’s put it this way: when the snow piles up outside, Fido makes piles inside.

It stinks when your pooch won’t go in the snow.

Check out three ways to help your dog cope with winter weather:

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Training Pads

Try placing those puppy training pads by the back door. If you trained your pup to use these pads as a puppy, he or she will likely adjust in no time. If you didn’t, there’s no time like the present.

True, these pads are a bit of a hassle and don’t fully prevent the stink. The good news it that they are easy to dispose of and they help to keep your pooch’s business out of the carpet. That’s a #WIN in our book.

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Doggy Outerwear

It’s possible your pooch isn’t going into the snow because it’s too cold. This is especially true for short hair, warm weather breeds (such as Chihuahuas) and low clearance breeds (like dachshunds). Try outfitting your dog with a doggie sweater, or, if it’s really cold, a doggy parka. If temperature is the main issue, this might be all it takes to get your dog going again.

Another possibility is that the snow is just too much for your pup’s paws to handle. The answer you may being looking to solve your pooch’s poop problem is some doggy snow boots. Rugged and water-resistant, these dog shoes will give added traction as well as protection from the cold.

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ESA or PSA Certification?

The benefits of an Emotional Support Animal certification and a Psychiatric Service Dog certification are drastically different. Fortunately for you, American Service Pets’ network of active board certified doctors can help you find the right path to certification. To find out whether you need an ESA or PSD letter, take our easy, three-step Pet Owner Survey!

Clear a Patch and Keep It Clean

If the previous options aren’t working well enough, it’s time to put on your (human) parka and do a little work outside. Try clearing a small patch right outside your back door, or clearing a path to the grass. Some dogs will get a little freaked out by snow that’s more than a couple inches deep, and clearing a path might be all they need. You can also use a little salt or sand product to keep the area melted.

If the cleared patch is on a patio or deck, you might try placing a training pad in the cleared out patch. Your dog might need a little encouragement that the location is OK for now.

Warmer weather is just around the corner. Until then, use these three tips to help control your dog’s winter weather “going” habits.

Get Your ESA Today

ATTENTION

Due to the new Department of Transportation (DOT) policy, Emotional Support Animals are NO longer allowed to fly in airplane cabins for free. However, Psychiatric Service Dogs are eligible.

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Attention: Due to the new Department of Transportation (DOT) policy, Emotional Support Animals are NO longer allowed to fly in airplane cabins for free. However, Psychiatric Service Dogs are eligible. Click here to see if you qualify.